Kids (4-12)

5 Things to Teach Your Kids About Failure


It’s never easy to watch our children fail.  But, we can take heart that failure can actually make our children stronger, more resilient and more empathetic, if we teach them to handle failure the right way.

1. Failure Happens to Everyone.

Even the best baseball players get hits only 4 out of 10 times at the plate.  No one wins them all.

2. Failure Isn’t a License to be a Bad Sport.

Failing is not a good feeling and it’s okay to be sad or disappointed when we fail. But, we don’t want to take it too far and start blaming others or pouting.

3. Failure Can Lead to Success.

Thomas Edison tried dozens and dozens of times before he invented the modern light bulb.  We really can learn from our mistakes.

4. Failure Teaches Us Humility.

If we don’t experience failure, how can we really relate and encourage others when they are experiencing defeat?

5. Failure is Not Who We Are.

We need to teach our children that their true value comes from just being.  They need to know they are loved, win or lose.

 

 

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  • Mommy23

    Sooooo needed this! Thank you Michelle Dugger for being so willing to put herself out there as a human (not perfect) example. She doesn’t try to act like she has it all figured out perfectly. She is so gracious and non-judgemental. Thank you Susan Merrill so much from a mom who also tends to have a bit of a temper and gets weary and frustrated at times. We are fighting the good fight though.

  • Tosin A.

    When angry whisper. That needs to be my daily mantra as a mother. *takes deep breathe*

  • Jenna Sears

    Great suggestions– I especially enjoy the idea of whispering– not sure how they are ever going to hear me, but I’m going to give it a try! “Soft Spoken Parenting” by Dr. Wally Goddard promotes similar ideals for parenting. Thanks for the reminder to show more love!

  • cdl5555

    This is ridiculous. I realize that times are changing, but let go of the umbilical cord mom’s! Yes, get to know the parents, Yes, have a way to communicate with your child when they’d like to come home. That’s all great, but seriously, “g-rated movies” and “computer filters” and then you lump that in with “don’t micromanage”. A little contradicting? Let them go, see how they do, and assess if you should do that again.. Go with the flow. Children connect best with someone approachable, not the mom handing out rules like M&M’s