5 Tweaks That Will Revolutionize Your Kids’ Organization Skills


kids organization

If there’s a type A for housekeeping, then I’m types D and S—disorganized and scattered! Unfortunately, my children have observed and learned from my example. It’s taken me a while to realize that there are some simple procedures (a scary word to a non-type A) I can use to teach my kids organization.

You won’t need elaborate charts or extensive discussions to put these into practice. You will need a positive attitude and a little endurance. And if you’re already a type A with kids who are, too, you’ll still find an idea or two to freshen up your routine. Let us know which one is your favorite and check out our free related printables. They will get you on the road to organizational success.

I do. We do. You do.

All of you teachers out there have probably heard this one. It’s been around for a long time because it works. When you’re teaching your children organizational skills, show them how first—I do. If you want your children to put their backpacks and school gear in a certain area, show them by taking it and placing it there. Next, put it away with them—we do. Finally, let them try it on their own—you do.

Routines are your friend—and your kids’ friend, too.

Start by taking a look at a timeline of your day. When do things get super disorganized? In what areas does your kids’ organization need some extra attention? Examine them and find routines to streamline the process. A friend of mine with small children has a great idea for getting school uniforms ready the night before. She folds the uniform and tucks a pair of socks inside it. That way, when her daughter gets up in the morning, she can grab her clothes and avoid the mad morning rush of looking for a missing sock or pair of shorts.

Put pencil to paper.

Let your kids keep track of their organizational success with Check, Check, Done or one of our cute habit trackers. We have a cool floral one, a geometric one, and one designed especially for chores. Hang them where your children can reach them, and let them check off the boxes for each day they stay organized or do their chores.Check, Check, Done Checklist

Organize first.

If you want organization to happen at your house, make it a clear priority. That means if your son wants to play Xbox, he’ll have to put away his belongings first. If your daughter wants to chat with friends, she’ll need to put her shoes in the shoe bin. Teach your kids organization with by saying, “Work before play, that’s the way!”

Protect your counters.

This one ties into having a place for everything and everything in its place. Not having a spot for our children’s things means it’ll likely end up on the counters, on the floor, or under their bed. If you start noticing an accumulation of stuff dropped somewhere, dissect it and figure out if each item actually does have a home. If it doesn’t, figure out the best place to keep it.

What are your tips for raising organized kids?

Comments