Comedy


Tag


MPAA Rating:
R
Genre:
Comedy
Runtime:
100 mins
Stars:
Jeremy Renner, Ed Helms, Jake Johnson, Hannibal Burgess, Jon Hamm, Isla Fisher, Annabelle Wallis
Director:
Jeff Tomsic
Producer:
Mark Steilen, Todd Garner, Sean Robins

Content at a Glance

4
Sex

Sex

Approved: 0-2 in any category

 

0:
none
1:
on-screen acts of romance
2:
infidelity; implied pre-marital sex or secondary lead characters with consequences
3:
inappropriate sexual relations without consequences
4-5:
graphic sexual activity is heard and/or seen
×
5
Language

Sex

Approved: 0-2 in any category

 

0:
none
1:
on-screen acts of romance
2:
infidelity; implied pre-marital sex or secondary lead characters with consequences
3:
inappropriate sexual relations without consequences
4-5:
graphic sexual activity is heard and/or seen
×
3
Violence

Violence

Approved: 0-2 in any category

 

0:
none
1:
on-screen acts of romance
2:
infidelity; implied pre-marital sex or secondary lead characters with consequences inappropriate sexual relations without consequences
4-5:
graphic sexual activity is heard and/or seen
×
4
Drugs

Drugs

Approved: 0-2 in any category

 

0:
none
1:
occasional drinking by secondary characters (i.e., man in bar)
2:
historically accurate use of alcohol and tobacco products
3:
continuous drinking and drug use common throughout
4-5:
drug/alcohol used many times by main character(s) shown in a positive light
×
2
Nudity

Nudity

Approved: 0-2 in any category

 

0:
none
1:
baby’s behind; shirtless men, low cut shirts, short skirts seen occasionally on women
2:
rear nudity that is not suggestive such as skinny dipping from a distance; cleavage
3:
sexually suggestive and revealing clothing or underwear is common throughout
4-5:
frontal nudity
×
0

Other

Approved: 0-2 in any category

 

Lead characters that exhibit disrespect for authority, lying, cheating, stealing, illegal activity, witchcraft or sorcery

0:
none
1:
mild-moderate with consequences
2:
moderate poor behavior
3:
moderate-heavy behavior with no consequences
4-5:
extreme portrayals, condoned or excused
×

Sex


sexual humor throughout, often racy and crude; reference to premarital sex

Language


language throughout, including (but not limited to): f***, sh**, d**k; da**; omg/jesus christ

Violence


comic action, including hitting, falling, and objects being thrown at characters

Drugs


character frequently smokes marijuana in most of his scenes; several scenes of moderate, social drinking; character uses chloroform to knock out characters

Nudity


a brief rear buttocks

Other


No Information


Trailer



Synopsis

One month every year, five highly competitive friends hit the ground running for a no-holds-barred game of tag—risking their necks, their jobs and their relationships to take one another down. This time, the game coincides with the wedding of the only undefeated player. What should be an easy target soon becomes an all-out war as he knows they're coming to get him.


Movie Message

In a time where it would seem fiction is more desirable than the truth, Tag inherently makes the case for the other way around. To describe in a way that I believe is spoiler-free, the film rolls credits showing actual footage of a group of friends variously sneaking up on each other and gently tagging them. No, the action, the thrills, the attention-grabbing comedy and quick-paced editing are missing. But what we are left with is pure, unadulterated sweetness, at the core of most good friendships.

That is not to deny Tag of its sweetness. The pranks, gags, and ultimately machoism would likely seem heavy handed if there was absolutely nothing to care about in these characters. None of the actors stand point, which is meant to be a compliment. The believability in these friendships is what is integral to the core of the film, and in a mostly balanced way (Hannibal Burgess' character seems to be cut short too often), these relationships are sold to us for a fair price.

Yet with all the antics that pervade every frame, the guesswork it takes from the audience to wonder what is part of the joke and what is not, the film feels like busywork. Unlike the very fun Game Night from earlier this year, the constant narrative shifts and second-guessing doesn't quite ring as "fun." Instead, it strips a little from the core, the sweetness, of the truth of the story, making it overly complex.

The Dove Take:

As far as plot and character goes, Tag has great potential for being an underdog Dove-Approved film. It is an example of crass jokes being taken too far out of context, chiseling away at its kindhearted underbelly. There is something special to be appreciate here, what with friendship spanning the country all in the name of youthful fun and games. But because the film's content is more adult-oriented, the experience for all cannot be enjoyed and experienced.

Surely many audiences will enjoy the film for its far-fetched antics, and perhaps the sweetness is more attainable based on the eyes of the beholder. As far as younger audiences, the film does not receive approval.

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